Discrepancies in the radiocarbon dating area of the turin shroud

The blind-test method was abandoned, because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and it was therefore still possible for a laboratory to identify the shroud sample.

group expected to perform the radiometric examination under its own aegis and after the other examinations had been completed, while the laboratories considered radio-carbon dating to be the prime test, which should be completed at the detriment of other tests, if necessary.

The lab representatives were not present at this packaging process, in accordance with the protocol.

discrepancies in the radiocarbon dating area of the turin shroud-87

As reported in Nature, Professor Bray of the Instituto di Metrologia 'G.

Colonetti', Turin, "confirmed that the results of the three laboratories were mutually compatible, and that, on the evidence submitted, none of the mean results was questionable." Although the quality of the radiocarbon testing itself is unquestioned, criticisms have been raised regarding the choice of the sample taken for testing, with suggestions that the sample may represent a medieval repair fragment rather than the image-bearing cloth.

and those "minute" fibers were identified as cotton by Peter South (textile expert of the Derbyshire laboratory) who said: "It may have been used for repairs at some time in the past, or simply became bound in when the linen fabric was woven.

It may not have taken us long to identify the strange material, but it was unique amongst the many and varied jobs we undertake.” The official report of the dating process, written by the people who performed the sampling, states that the sample "came from a single site on the main body of the shroud away from any patches or charred areas." Mechthild Flury-Lemberg is an expert in the restoration of textiles, who headed the restoration and conservation of the Turin Shroud in 2002.

group initially planned to conduct a range of different studies on the cloth, including radio-carbon dating. The six labs that showed interest in performing the procedure fell into two categories, according to the method they utilised: In 1982, the S. The blind-test method was abandoned because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and a laboratory could thus identify the shroud sample.

Gove consulted numerous laboratories which were able at the time (1982) to carbon-date small fabric samples. [...] The pressure on the ecclesiastic authorities to accept the Turin protocol have almost approached illegality. that discarding the blind-test method would expose the results – whatever they may be – to suspicion of unreliability. Shredding the samples would not solve the problem, while making it much more difficult and wasteful to clean the samples properly.She has rejected the theory of the "invisible reweaving", pointing out that it would be technically impossible to perform such a repair without leaving traces, and that she found no such traces in her study of the shroud.Prof H E Gove, former professor emeritus of physics at the University of Rochester and former director of the Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory at the University of Rochester, helped to invent radiocarbon dating and was closely involved in setting up the shroud dating project. that radiocarbon measurements on the shroud should be performed blind seem to the author to be lacking in merit; …

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